This is what’s going on in the #FeesMustFall2016 protests

Students across the country have rebuffed higher education minister Blade Nzimande’s recommendation of an 8% fee increase for 2017, as well as his proposal for a financial aid scheme that would see fee increases for poor and middle-class students’ tertiary education fees covered by the state. This turn of events has left many onlookers outside the academy scratching their heads. The students got what they want, right? So why are they still protesting? We’ll try to answer your questions. What do the students want? This…

International men’s day? For who? For what?

When I think about “men” – the men that come up in conversations that usually end on some variation of “men are bastards” - I’m not thinking about my father, cousins, husband or son, all of who are wonderfully warm and caring people. I think about the guy at university who told me that “All things being equal, a woman will never be as smart as a man,” the men who force themselves on girls in out of the way rooms and passages, who have abused children, who beat their wives or financially entrap them in abusive relationships…

Editorial: My heritage is the heritage of the not-good-enough

The funny thing about Heritage Day is that it always seems to boil down to that inherently judgey question – how you’ve chosen to spend it. Are you out there embracing the exterior markings of your particular culture, wearing certain clothes, cooking certain foods, or are you – gasp – being a commercialised pleb and braaiing? And it simply wouldn’t be Heritage Day if it wasn’t accompanied by a swathe of articles in which people argue about the meaning of Heritage Day. (Heads up: you’re currently reading one of those too.) If…

Collins Chabane, just another casualty on South Africa’s deathly roads

News that Public Service and Administration Minister Collins Chabane had died in a car crash on Sunday may have come as a shock, but the details trickling in since have been highly predictable. His death appears to have been no accident after all, but rather the confluence of dangerous driving and drunk driving. FARANAAZ PARKER wonders what it’ll take for South Africans to change our driving habits. Accident reconstruction experts have put Chabane's SUV traveling between 150 and 200kph at the time of impact. It went straight…

EFF forcibly removed from Parliament [video]

Members of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) were forcibly removed from Parliament after they disrupted the State of the Nation Address (Sona) to ask President Jacob Zuma to #paybackthemoney used to upgrade his personal home in Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal. The parliamentary feed from inside the National Assembly was firmly focused on the Speaker for the House, Baleka Mbete, during the entire incident, but video shot on mobile devices soon leaked onto the internet. Mbete did not reference any specific Parliamentary rules when…

Why Sorbet should just leave Nancy to make her own decisions

I really thought that the Sorbet Group’s “Nancy” billboards - which implied that “unwaxed, unpolished” women would be “unloved” - would have annoyed and infuriated women everywhere. I was wrong. Because when discussions on the campaign started online there were still those who argued that it was a “first world problem”, that people were being overly sensitive and that only a “hairy bat” would be offended by it. Well, this overly sensitive, hairy bat has a first world problem with the Sorbet Group’s marketing tactics, and…

Editorial: Senzo Meyiwa and the 17,000 other murder victims we don’t talk about

Senzo Meyiwa is dead. He leaves behind grieving parents, a devastated wife and girlfriend, and children who will never get to know their father. I am deeply sympathetic to Meyiwa’s family, but the so-called “national mourning” for the footballing star has left me feeling cold and even cynical. For Meyiwa is just one of many young South Africans cut down in their prime because of gun violence. According to Gun Free South Africa, an estimated 18 people, each with family, friends, and unique talents, die of gun-related injuries…

Editorial: Why should we turn the other cheek?

Between the deaths of 84 South Africans in the collapse of a building belonging to the Synagogue Church of All Nations (SCOAN) in Nigeria, the devastation in the aftermath to the deadliest floods yet to hit Kashmir, the Scottish referendum on independence, Julius Malema being chucked out of Parliament (again) for calling the deputy president a murderer, and the imminent one-year anniversary of the Westgate Mall attack, it has been by no means a slow news week. All of these are important to our national conversation,…

Editorial: Two years and still no justice for Marikana miners

Every country has its pivotal moments, when things change so drastically that we later frame our history in terms of those moments. The Christian world has its BC and AD, the US has its pre-September 11, 2001 and post-September 11. In South Africa we speak about our country either before or after democracy, or before and after apartheid, with April 27, 1994 as the turning point we keep in our minds. But when the South African Police Services (SAPS) gunned down 34 striking miners on live television at a koppie near Marikana,…

Editorial: What to make of Women’s Month

It’s already August, and, although we weren’t trying to make a big deal about Women’s Month, it just sort of happened. The department of arts and culture kicked it off by asking people to #wearadoek and snap a selfie, and we just couldn’t wrap our scarves heads around what they were trying to achieve. Headscarves of various description can be cultural, religious or personal touchstones. But what they have to do with gender equality or the challenges facing women in South Africa was beyond us, and our writers were quick to…

Editorial: The race thing

Nothing puts people on the defensive or makes tempers flare the way race does – or rather talking about race and its derivatives, race and culture, race and religion, and of course race and class. We can’t really separate them from each other. Right? Last week, A Day in the Life of a South African Maid went viral. It swept through Twitter, bounced off the walls on Facebook and Reddit, and found its way onto left-wing and right-wing websites. (Some angry expats dropped in for some finger-wagging, apparently.) But what was it…

Why we’ve had enough of this casual harassment

Last week one of our reporters proposed that we begin a new project, a series perhaps, that deals with the harassment that South African women face as they go about their lives each day. “Street harassment is such a big problem in SA and there's really nobody talking about it until girls are caught on CCTV camera being hounded by a group of men at Noord taxi rank. Those girls were not an exception, that incident just happened to have been caught on camera,” our reporter, Pontsho Pilane, said. The issue resonated with us. In…

Trevor Noah broke our site

When we launched the Daily Vox a week ago, we were hoping to draw anywhere between a thousand and two thousand readers a day. But we surpassed these humble expectations when we got over 70,000 hits within the first week, a spike in traffic so large that our service provider took our site down because of security fears. The bots were coming, they said. But they were wrong. It was a timely tweet from Trevor Noah and real people came marching in. // Post by Trevor Noah. Our reporters went out to find stories about young South…

A nod to the young: What this site is all about

Managing Editor, FARANAAZ PARKER, explains the motivation and ambition of the Daily Vox project.  This Youth Day, the journalism project formerly known as South African Votes 2014 is relaunching as The Daily Vox. In what started as an attempt to drive the election story though the voices, ideas and concerns of the citizen, The Daily Vox will put the citizen at the centre of news. Even then, our young journalists will seek to find, curate and amplify the voices of young South Africans caught grudgingly between the drudgery of…